Crowd-funding campaigns: Elemental Festival and Limerick Craft Hub

Two very worthy Limerick artistic ventures are running crowd-funding campaigns at the moment—Elemental Arts & Culture Festival and Limerick Craft Hub. I’m sure they’d both be bowled over with any support you could give them and all the information is below. Good luck to both in achieving their funding aims.

Screen Shot 2015-07-28 at 20.32.29The volunteer-led Elemental Arts & Culture Festival has been running since 2012 and brings a diverse mix of “the arts in all their guises” over a weekend in September. Events include disciplines but not limited to: visual art, street theatre, music, crafts, forgotten skills, youth theatre, comedy, print, acrobatics, film and photography. This year’s proposed programme will be no different and events will include a sign-artists event ‘Love Letters from Limerick’, film screenings including the Oscar nominated Song of the Sea, theatre show Charolais and much more.

The aim is €2,000 and all funds collected on this campaign will go directly to the programme to pay artists, venues, technicians, equipment hire, accommodation, transport, printing costs and insurance. The festival doesn’t receive Arts Council funding. Elemental won Best Programme at the National Festival Awards (AOIFE) and was shortlisted for Best Website and Best Merchandise as well as being shortlisted for the National Green Awards. Their mission statement also includes using Elemental as a platform for supporting charities and the local community too. Past collaborations include: The Blue Box, Special Olympics, The Children’s Ark, the Ger McDonnell Memorial Fund, Limerick’s Buzzing and Fairtrade Limerick.

It’s a festival with a great can-do, ‘if you build it, they will come’ feel and “created by people with a passion for Limerick with the purpose of animating the city through the arts”. Some of the rewards include tickets to events, books, exclusive merchandise featuring the art of Jacob Stack and even some yummy gelato.

I’ve made my contribution so I’m really looking forward to the weekend. The deadline is just four days away so please consider investing in this event HERE!

www.elementalfestival.com

PS: Here’s a lovely video promoting Elemental…

Screen Shot 2015-07-28 at 21.13.08A not for profit organisation of 50 local craftspeople who support and promote crafts handmade in Limerick, Limerick Craft Hub was set up last year.

It is a legacy project of Limerick City of Culture 2014 and the collective “walked into an empty building last July and together we transformed it into the bright, busy space that you see today. Our exclusive high calibre craft outlet has a gallery space at the rear. We also have three fully operational craft studios, which are open to the public”.

The hub has a thriving Community Craft Corner where people come and knit every Monday and Friday morning for charities and for fun and it runs craft workshops on a regular basis.

Limerick Craft Hub wants to upscale and improve the craft shop, gallery and studio spaces.

In their own words: “We have secured a grant from LEO but need to match it with our own funds to actually receive the grant. This is where you guys come in, we need your help to raise those funds! The money raised will go towards a bigger kiln, a new coffee machine, a more dependable and faster till system,  and laptops for our marketing team. We want to be able to offer you more workshops, events, public rentable kiln space, a relaxed atmosphere in which to enjoy a coffee during community crafting and a greater overall experience when you walk in through our doors.”

Rewards for contributions include cups of delicious Pónaire coffee and a selection of the wares made and sold here including honey, felt crafts, lip balm, ceramics, jewellery and lamps. The target is €14,000 and there are 19 days left in the campaign. To support this crafty endeavour, click HERE!

www.limerickcrafthub.ie

PS: Here’s a fun video outlining the craft hub and its campaign…

Call for papers/presentations for Light Moves Festival of Screendance symposium

dancelimericksmsFollowing the success of the inaugural Light Moves Festival of Screendance in Limerick last year, it is returning from 19-22 November 2015 and it is sending out an open call for papers and presentations for the symposium, which forms part of the festival.

The symposium’s subject is “Peeling Away the Layers” and the closing date for submissions. Friday 7 August. The symposium sits within the Light Moves festival and aims to encourage artistic and scholarly exchange, debate and discussion in screendance and related disciplines including performance, dance, film, visual arts, sound and text.

Light Moves is Ireland’s only festival of Screendance and is dedicated to the art of dance film and video art with movement as a central theme.

The festival is hosted by Dance Limerick and DMARC (Digital Media and Arts Research Centre) at the University of Limerick. It will take place at Dance Limerick and is supported by the Arts Council and Limerick City and County Council as well as the hosts.

“The festival is a response to the vibrant and expanding field of dance film/ screendance in Ireland.  Light Moves is curated by Jurgen Simpson and Mary Wycherley and combines classics, family screenings, invited works, open submissions and explorations of screendance with some of the most respected figures in the field.“

LightMoves cover_ Beach Party AnimalProposals should be submitted in PDF format only (more details below) to lightmovesfestival@gmail.com and the full details are available from www.lightmoves.ie.

Topics
Proposals for presentations, papers and project discussions are invited from national and international practitioners and scholars. Experimental and/or group formats of presentation are welcome. Papers and project presentations may include but are not limited to the following areas:

  • Screendance as a language for social, cultural and political conversations.
  • Let’s talk about digital: Challenging the allure of High Definition; The ubiquitous camera; Primitive technologies, embracing artefact and rediscovering lo-fi.
  • Screendance conventions and the interplay between mainstream and experimental practices.
  • Mediating and experiencing time in screendance (uninterrupted, compressed and expanded time).
  • Harnessing performativity; liveness in screendance.
  • Confronting stereotype (body, dance and location).

Submissions:

Proposals should be no more than 300 words and should include:

  • Title of paper or presentation.
  • A maximum 300 word abstract (including brief description of the questions, concepts and topics to be explored).
  • Preferred presentation format/approach.
  • A short biography.
  • A/V requirements.
  • Website links supporting the proposal, if available.

www.lightmoves.ie

Community Theatre: Saving The House of Delmege, tomorrow night/Sat 11 July

Moyross sign

The Hollywood-esque sign announcing the Moyross was entering the community theatre scene last year!

After the success of community theatre project, Moyross, last year, a new community theatre group was set up in the north side area. Now, the budding actors and actresses in Moyross Community Drama are preparing  for their exciting debut production—Saving The House of Delmege—tomorrow evening (Friday 10 July).

The venue is the Hunt Museum and the plot is as follows: “Faced with mounting debts from her late, philandering husband’s ancestral home, Lady Constance Delmege desperately wants her only daughter to marry into money – even if it means marrying Norbert, the foppish son of the ‘new money’, neighbouring Caulfield estate.  What unfolds is a story filled with twists and turns, trickery, promiscuity, social climbers, an Italian count and a sulky!”

This comedy costume drama, set in Limerick the early 1900s, will feature a cast of Carrie Barrett, Lucia Brunetti, Majella Conway, Ursula Dundon, Sheila Fitzpatrick, Philip Hackett, Ger Purcell, Leanne O’Donnell and Conchi Ortiz.

During Limerick City of Culture 2014, many Moyross residents took part in workshops with Dublin-based, Theatre Club for Moyross and also with playwright, Mike Finn, and writer, Helena Close. In September 2014, Moyross Residents’ Forum invited to begin a weekly drama workshop.  Since that time, a group of 11 regular members, and as many occasional workshop participants, have attended the weekly workshop in Corpus Christi School.  The result of all of these workshops is a new devised piece of drama, Saving the House of Delmege.

According to drama facilitator, Monica Spencer, “the cast of the new work are new to this style of performance although Sheila Fitzpatrick-O’Donnell, Lucia Brunetti and Phillip Hackett are regular readers of their own poetry in the White House on Wednesday nights.  Sheila, along with Majella Conway and Ursula Dundon also performed in Moyross, the play.  All cast members are incredibly enthusiastic about the project and each one is delivering performances in rehearsal that belie their level of experience”.

Saving the House of Delmege is on at 7pm tomorrow and there will also be a show on Saturday 11 July at 3pm. Further performances will take place in Moyross in September/October with details of dates and venue to be announced.

Tickets are €5 and booking is recommended because audience numbers are limited to 50. Booking on moyrossdrama@gmail.com or 087-6047262.

This is one of the many community based drama initiatives taking place in Limerick at the moment.  It has support from The GAFF as well as from PAUL Partnership, Limerick City and County Arts Office and from LCETB.

 

A chance to support Dear Mr. Le Bon

Screen Shot 2015-04-23 at 19.23.06A friend of mine drew my attention to an interesting publishing project, which music fans may want to contribute to through crowd-funding.

Dear Mr. Le Bon is a proposed book made up of “letters to pop stars regarding their work from a retired member of the public with genuine replies from the artists themselves”. If this is something you’d like to read, you can support their efforts at the Kickstarter link here.

Derek Philpott and Wilf Turnbull, from Bournemouth in the UK, wrote to numerous musicians with friendly enquiries about their work.

The two lads had this to say: “Hello Everyone! We are both pensioners living in Bournemouth who write to popstars about their song lyrics, and they often reply. We also have animations on youtube which are very popular. It’s great to see popstars taking an interest in us ordinary members of the public! And, if you are in any doubt, please be reassured that all replies are totally genuine and are directly from the desks of the bona fide artistes themselves!”

There are a lot of artists involved, from Survivor to Slade, Edwyn Collins to Kaiser Chiefs.

The artists and the media have positive things to say about it, such as:

“It was most enjoyable to be involved in a letter that did not involve one of my ex wives’ solicitors” – Rick Wakeman

”Somewhere between Henry Root and John Shuttleworth – what a hoot!” Julie Burchill

”Now we have Wilf and Derek, two Bournemouth OAPS who write to pop stars old and new, taking them to task for their absurd lyrics. Follow their adventures” Bruce Dessau, Evening Standard

”Good luck, the both of you x” David Quantick

”Thanks for the brilliant work and for allowing me fence with such a formidable comic swordsman. Count me in for whatever helps the Grand Cause!!” Dave Was, Was Not Was

I love the feel of your jibe…Whatever you do will be creative and great. Hope I can help”..Chris Difford, Squeeze

This project will only be funded if at least £16,000 is pledged by Sunday, 3 May. Good luck to the chaps!

Review: Chalk at Dance Limerick & Upcoming events

dance_limk_theo_clinkard_picI haven’t been going to see too many theatrical or dance performances so far this year, which is unusual for me so I was delighted to be invited to go to Chalk at Dance Limerick last Tuesday.

A piece devised and performed by dancer/choreographer, Theo Clinkard, accompanied by a live score by James Keane, it was inspired by the iconic chalk cliffs of the south coast of England and in tune with the blurb, it was indeed an “inventive and intensely physical work”.

A quote in the description by Clinkard read: “I recently found out that the reason that chalk is white is because it is formed out of the minute skeletons of marine life, compressed over billions of years…You could essentially say it’s made of bone”.

This fascinating idea and its seaside, windswept setting was explored in various ways through dance, with atmospheric music (a lot of loop tracks) and sound effects recorded live with everything from trombones to stones. With every recording unique to the venue and performance, there is a certain unpredictability and that adds to the energy.

A particularly interesting sequence was when Keane recorded celery being broken up only for Clinkard to don a black Lycra suit with a skeleton on it and then move to the soundtrack of those sounds. It played on the idea of the microscopic skeletons being bashed around and also the tragic reality that death is ever present here. People regularly commit suicide by jumping off the cliffs and there are accounts dating back through the ages. He brought it right into the present by reading the most recent report by a local group, which patrols the cliffs aiming to help people in distress.

The ‘set’ was just a white diamond shaped area on the floor, which allowed for the space to be used to its full potential. The windows were not blacked out and the failing light of sunset added a nice ambiance to it. Any props were used creatively i.e. the tiny plasticine figure put onto an upright white trestle table to give an idea of scale. He also interacted with the audience by relaying information to people to relay along Chinese whisper-style. The show had a careful balance of seriousness and playfulness.

Everything flowed nicely and even the abstract elements weren’t indecipherable because there was a context and setting—evoked very well by the choreography and the production design. It was a thought provoking and enjoyable show.

For anyone interested you can watch a video promo of Chalk below…

CHALK from Roswitha Chesher on Vimeo.

The next show in Dance Limerick is Moving On by Spoken Dance, which is on this Thursday (23 April) at 8pm and on Friday (24 April) at 11am (tickets €12/10; group discounts available).

This is an evening of contemporary dance, film and performance, Moving On offers the audience an insight into the exciting, new and ambitious work of Limerick’s

integrated dance company.

“Following a period of examination and reflection into the medium of dance film, Spoken Dance will present live dance performance along with five short dance films which have been produced, directed and edited in collaboration with Limerick based disabled and non-disabled artists…Moving on uses film, movement and text to investigate choices around whether we allow our responses to define us or not.”

Two of the films represent the poetry of the Thursday Club of Enable Ireland, Mungret. One of the films was created by disabled dancer Danny Aherne as part of a research project where he was mentored by Mary Wycherley from the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. The two other films feature very different duets between a disabled and non-disabled dancer.

The short film, A Sense of Pleasure, which features disabled dancers Mary Keogh and Deirdre Corry of Spoken Dance has been nominated for two awards at Limerick Film Festival. Another dancer, Antoin Cross, has been nominated for Best Factual Feature at Limerick Film Festival for This Integration- a documentary featuring Spoken Dance.

Spoken Dance recently launched integrated dance classes at Dance Limerick which are open to disabled and non-disabled participants. It is a professional company of disabled and non-disabled dancers led by Lisa Cahill and Mary Hartney. Spoken Dance has been creating and performing new, original contemporary dance works since 2011.

On the 30th April—the collaborative dance project, Sum of Parts, is on in the venue. This will see the culmination of a collaboration of Megan Kennedy, Limerick’s Dance Artist-in-Residence co-ordinating with 10 professional dance artists based in Limerick.

For more information on Dance Limerick and events there, see www.dancelimerick.ie.